Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInTweet about this on Twitter

In Dublin, Ireland, the Fire Brigade is n the final steps to completing drone guidelines. They are hoping that the guidelines will be operational by the end of the year.

The unmanned flying devices will be deployed as a means to gather crucial operational intelligence on fires and other emergency situations.

This news comes in the wake of many countries finalising regulations around the commercial use of drones. From the mining industry to filming, many companies have adopted the use of drones to better their day-to-day operations.

So far, 6 people have been trained in the Dublin Fire Brigade.

A severe and prolonged blaze at Ballymount industrial estate in Dublin last April presented a first opportunity to test their effectiveness. Drones can climb higher than traditional fire ladders, and film expansive areas, allowing officers to gather crucial information in an short timeframe.

While Dublin Fire Brigade is reluctant to comment on the potential extent of future drone usage, it is clear they have the ability to significantly enhance responses to emergencies.

In the UK, the technology has been adopted by fire services, where they have been fitted with infrared cameras that can penetrate smoke, as well as night-vision capability.

Besides reaching higher than traditional ladders and penetrating smoke, the drones can also help locate missing people, measure the extent of fires and help calculate the logistics of fighting them are just some of the immediate advantages offered by a relatively inexpensive and fast developing technology.

See: RocketMine’s first Search and Rescue Mission

While Search and Rescue Missions are not RocketMine’s primary focus, our team has the capabilities and resources to pull of the task.

Contact us to see how we can help with your company or project