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A team of specialist surveyors could solve the UK’s flooding problem, preventing future disasters.

Tollesbury company Geocurve, part of international aerospaces service Strat Aero, in Woodrolfe Road, carries out airborne surveillance and analyses bodies of water.

Strat Aero CEO Tony Dunleavey believes Geocurve’s unmanned drones, attached to aerial platforms, could digitally map out flooding across the UK by the end of the year and calculate how much water can be held in flood defences.

The data would help the Government to secure flood defences and stop a repeat of the dramatic flooding suffered across the north of England over recent years.

Mr Dunleavey said: “By harnessing the huge advantages of Strat Aero’s technology, we can look to alleviate the suffering experienced by the victims of flooding, making the devastation seen in recent months across the UK a distant memory.”

He has written to the Government explaining his proposal would be “900 per cent more accurate” than national survey data and drones would be able to map landscapes to within 10cm below water.

From the data collected, officials would be able to come up with an effective solution to the problem and put defences in the right places.

The technology proved itself after successfully mapping the flood defences of the Norfolk Broads National Park for the Environment Agency.

Mr Dunleavey believes the work could be completed by December and save the Government money, while being repeated annually to provide up-to-date data.

He said: “We believe we can provide an up-to-date and more comprehensive dataset than has ever existed for the UK’s coastline and waterways.”

Director of Geocurve, Gary Nel, said using the systems would be the quickest, greenest and most reliable way of solving the problem.

He said: “It has been a tough task to get UAV platforms accepted as a professional survey tool.

“However, they are now seen as more accurate and more efficient than traditional survey methods, as well as being intrinsically safe and green.”